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Course Catalog

Undergraduate Students

Graduate Students

Undergraduate Students

ART_HIST 101-6 – Freshman Seminar: Social Histories of Photography

This seminar introduces students to histories of photography, attentive to the role the medium has played socially across space and time.  Looking at photographs from the early nineteenth century to present day, the course explores how notions of citizenship, justice, social visibility, criminality, history, memory, truth, race, class, and gender have been variously negotiated through different forms of and engagements with photography.
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ART_HIST 101-6 – Freshman Seminar: Rococo Fashion: Art & Power

ART_HIST 225 – Introduction to Medieval Art

This course offers an introduction to major artistic monuments and artistic developments of the medieval period (roughly 300-1450 CE) with a focus on Europe. It surveys a diverse range of works of art and architecture from this period and positions them within their original social, political, economic and spiritual contexts. Lectures and discussion sections will trace the shifting ways in which images were defined and perceived over time and consider how the flow of objects and styles linked Europeans to broader world systems. We will also identify key moments in the birth and development of architectural forms still common today such as churches and mosques. Students will develop skills in visual analysis and gain a basic understanding of the methods and aims of art historical study.

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ART_HIST 232 – Introduction to the History of Architecture 1400 to Present

ART_HIST 240 – Introduction to Asian Art

ART_HIST 260/ATP 270 – Introduction to Contemporary Art

ART_HIST 320-3 – Medieval Art: Late Medieval: Gothic

ART_HIST 330-2 – Renaissance and Mannerism: Southern European Art 1400-1600

ART_HIST 350-1 – 19th Century Art 1: 1800-1848

Writing in the twentieth century, Walter Benjamin declared Paris to be the “Capitol of the Nineteenth Century.” But how did it come to be known as such? This course will take up the history of Paris from 1800 to 1848 to understand how Paris became synonymous with art and fashion all during an era of political revolution. Covering the French Revolution of 1789, the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), and the revolutions of 1830 and 1848, we will look at how popular culture, fashion, race, and politics coalesced in the artworks of Jacques-Louis David, Marie-Guillemine Benoist, Antonio Canova, Théodore Géricault, and Honoré Daumier, among others.

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ART_HIST 350-2 – 19th Century Art 2: 1848-1900

ART_HIST 375-0/HUM 225-0-20 – Media Theory: An Introduction

How do media impact our sense of such fundamental concepts as personhood, time and space, and social life? How do new technologies transform sensory experience at different moments in history? This course provides an introduction to the field of theoretical writings within the humanities addressing the nature of media and the role of technology in twentieth- and twenty-first century culture. We will pay close attention to the work of key media theorists, including (but not limited to) Walter Benjamin, Marshall McLuhan, and Donna Haraway. We will also analyze works of art, sound, film, and literature in order to catalyze, test, and expand our sense of how media matter.  

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ART_HIST 386 – Art of Africa

ART_HIST 386 – Art of Africa

ART_HIST 389 – Special Topics: Court, Company, Bazaar: Reframing South Asia’s Long 19th Century

This seminar unpacks the entangled histories of colonial, imperial, court art and the marketplace in late 18th to early 20thcentury South Asia. The course examines the role of images as markers of social and cross-cultural encounters addressing key shifts within visual culture, patronage and collecting practices engaging with a wide of media from drawings, paintings, prints, ivory souvenirs and photographs. Focusing on South Asia’s transition period, spanning regional court culture to the end of colonial rule under the Raj, the course will situate the study of this era’s visual culture within the broader framework of the modernity-tradition bind, the rise of nationalism, and the struggle for independence.  

Textbooks – there are two reference readings that will form the background of the course. The students are not required to buy the books, but can consult them as needed.

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ART_HIST 390 – Undergraduate Seminar: On South African Cultural Expression: Art and the Post-Apartheid Imagination

ART_HIST 390 – Undergraduate Seminar: Cairo/Paris: Art & Empire in the Modern City

ART_HIST 391 – Undergraduate Methods Seminar

ART_HIST 395 – Undergraduate Seminar: ‘A Site of Struggle’ and Museological Practice

ART_HIST 395 – COSI Undergrad Seminar: Grad Student

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Graduate Students

ART_HIST 402 – Writing Seminar

This seminar is designed for and limited to second-year Art History graduate students reworking an existing seminar paper into their Qualifying Paper. Organized around a series of assignments, it will be conducted as a workshop. We will work on maximizing the effectivity of the paper’s arguments by considering its structure and the use of sources and images and to develop our individual voice as writers. While the primary purpose of the seminar is to produce a final or nearly finalized QP text, we will also reflect on and develop skills related to giving and receiving feedback in respectful and constructive ways.
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ART_HIST 403 – Mellon COSI Objects and Materials

ART_HIST 406 – Dissertation Prospectus

ART_HIST 420 – Global Medieval Art History-Problems and Possibilities

ART_HIST 403 – Studies in Baroque Art: Material Histories of Race, Animating Eighteenth-Century Sculpture and the Decorative Arts

ART_HIST 460 – Studies in Contemporary Art: Art Historical Fictions

This course examines art work that engages the fictional and looks too at art historical discourses as kinds of fictions.  Special attention will be paid to these practices in the African diaspora.  More broadly, the class explores art historical, literary, and historical methodologies that offer new interpretations of the past through critical fabulation and the fictional.  Students will read the work of Saidiya Hartman, Coco Fusco, Hannah Crafts, and Katherine McKittrick.

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ART_HIST 460/MENA – Studies in 20th & 21st Century Art: Aesthetics of Solidarity

ART_HIST 480 – Studies in Asian Art: Art and Visual Culture in the Global Mughal World

The Mughal empire occupied a position of political, economic, and demographic dominance in the early modern period surpassing others such as the Safavids and the Ottomans. Its visual culture absorbed the intellectual heritage of Indic and Central Asian traditions expressed in its lndo-Persianate court culture that positioned itself globally. The concurrent rise of European mercantile and colonial interests of the English, Dutch and French East India Companies in the region further contributed to a ‘worlding’ of Mughal aesthetics. This course will address global and cross-cultural themes in art and visual culture of South Asia between the 16th and 19th centuries covering the diverse arts of the Mughal State to address the broader cultural and epistemological contexts within which Mughal-era art and architecture flourished.

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